Review of “Dear Human” by Cosmo Mercurio

This brief tale takes the form of two letters addressed to the human race. Neither are signed. It’s not clear who the letters are from, but it doesn’t really matter. Some humans fear technology, particularly the internet of things, will become less of a tool and more of a master. The letter-writer wishes to assureContinue reading “Review of “Dear Human” by Cosmo Mercurio”

Review of “True Enough Believers” by Karl Lykken

This short piece looks at a time in the not-too-distant future when the algorithms that analyze our shopping and voting habits determine more than those. Cameras see more and microphones hear more. The average citizen puts on a show for the public as well as their closest family members. The consequences of non-conformity are notContinue reading “Review of “True Enough Believers” by Karl Lykken”

Review of “Universal Reality” by Michael Allen Lane

Jovak is about to enter the last keystroke that will implement drastic alterations to the software. The coding changes have been completed, and beta testing found no faults. These updates will test the versatility of the test subjects. He stretches his twenty-four arms, wiggling the twelve fingers on each and presses the button— The codingContinue reading “Review of “Universal Reality” by Michael Allen Lane”

Review of “takotsubo cardiomyopathy” by Gage Johnston

Ruby and Tom met at a “pitch,” a job interview. Neither got the job, but they went out together for a drink. They decided to “share a space.” Because they didn’t take a compatibility test, they had to pay an extra deposit. Everything goes well until Ruby gets a promotion. Now, she will be makingContinue reading “Review of “takotsubo cardiomyopathy” by Gage Johnston”

Review of “Speeding Toward Oblivion” by Steve Carr

Colm (not calm, but Colm) breaks the news to Director Tymo that they’ve managed to decipher images and sounds carried on radio signals they’ve been picking up since entering the present galaxy. The alien language is a simple tongue the natives refer to as “English.” The technicians have been able to puzzle out, “Greetings fromContinue reading “Review of “Speeding Toward Oblivion” by Steve Carr”

Review of “My Long-Term Relationship with Guns” by Daniel Dutilly

This essay is part of a contest sponsored by Memoir Magazine on the topic of guns and people. Author Daniel Dutilly begins describing his relationship with guns in childhood. His father, a Vietnam veteran, gave him and his younger brother plastic army guns for Christmas. They were four and five years old, and they lovedContinue reading “Review of “My Long-Term Relationship with Guns” by Daniel Dutilly”

Review of “To the editor: Monsters belong in schools” by Zella Christensen

As the title implies, this story takes the form of a letter to the editor, echoing nicely all polite sneering and the righteous indignation often found in such missives. At issue is the time-honored tradition of keeping various monsters in the dungeons of schools. The letter-writer concedes an earlier point from a “well-intentioned” Miss TickalContinue reading “Review of “To the editor: Monsters belong in schools” by Zella Christensen”

Review of “Prodrome” by Amanda Leigh

The title “Prodrome” is defined in an epigraph: “any symptom that signals the impending onset of a disease.” Sage tells his story in a series of journal entries beginning December 3, 2017. He is outside walking his dog when he sees the old man who lives in the apartment below him walking. The old manContinue reading “Review of “Prodrome” by Amanda Leigh”

Review of “The Case of the Fiery Fingers” by Erle Stanley Gardner

Perry Mason, attorney at law, is just returning to his office from a long day at court. His secretary, Della Street, has a pile of letters for him to sign, and one client to see. The potential has been waiting for an hour. Mason at first demurs, but Della tells him the girl is inContinue reading “Review of “The Case of the Fiery Fingers” by Erle Stanley Gardner”

Review of “Say ‘Cheese!'” by John Francis Keane

The story opens with an invitation: “Let us go to the place. It is time for us to live forever.” This could mean a couple of things. It becomes especially intriguing when the reader learns the tribe’s children stay behind in the care of “old Sundoo” because they cannot sit still long enough to liveContinue reading “Review of “Say ‘Cheese!’” by John Francis Keane”