Review of “On First Contacts and Second Chances” by Markus Lauerer

The story opens by telling the reader Earth’s first and only contact with an alien civilization has been a failure. This is not because of hostility. There was no threat to life as we know it, nor did an earth bug wipe the aliens out. We and the aliens, despite everyone’s best attempts, simply didn’t connect. After a year, the aliens went on their way.

Thoughts:

The prose of the story is as low-key as one might imagine. The author is saying, despite all the science fiction of the past when alien civilizations attempt or succeed to destroy Earth, whether for the purpose of enslavement of the natives or to make way for a hyperspace bypass, the truth is, well, a bit “less grandiose.” This is reflected in the voice of the story.

Of course, the author can’t leave it there. The final line as nice meaning and depth to the story. I liked it: five out of seven rocket dragons.

Bio:

According to his blur, author Markus Lauerer is a medical student from Munich, Germany. “On First Contacts and Second Chances” is his first English-language publication.

Title: “On First Contacts and Second Chances”
Author: Markus Lauerer
First published: Daily Science Fiction, March 11, 2019
Read: Daily Science Fiction, March 11, 2019

The story can be read here.

Published by 9siduri

I have written book and movie reviews for the late and lamented sites Epinions and Examiner. I have book of reviews of speculative fiction from before 1900, and short works in publications such Mobius, Protea Poetry Journal, and, most recently, Wisconsin Review and Drunken Pen Writing. I'm busily working away on a book of reviews pulp science fiction stories from the 1930s-1960s. It's a lot of fun. I am the author of the short story "Always Coming Home," a chapbook of poetry titled "Sotto Voce," and a collection of reviews of pre-1900 speculative fiction, "By Firelight."

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