Review of “The Invisible Woman” (1940)

The movie for this week’s Saturday pizza and bad movie night was extremely silly. The pizza was yummy. Plot: Wealthy playboy Richard Russell (John Howard) is bothered by little—until his lawyer tells him he is broke. He regretfully has to turn down a request for $3000 from an eccentric scientist friend, Professor Gibbs (John Barrymore)Continue reading “Review of “The Invisible Woman” (1940)”

Review of “Optic Covenant” by Katherine Ley

Plot: There really isn’t a plot to this flash fiction piece. It’s a portrait of a person held captive by a robot who loves him. (I use “him” for the sake of simplicity. The character’s sex is never indicated.) It’s for his own good that he’s tied to a chair and fed spoiled Brussels sprouts.Continue reading “Review of “Optic Covenant” by Katherine Ley”

Review of “The Return of the Vampire” (1943)

This is this week’s Saturday pizza and bad movie entry. The pizza was good if the movie was lukewarm, but it was nice to see a suitably menacing Bela Lugosi with Svengoolie. Plot:The opening scenes show a wide-eyed young woman (uncredited Jeanne Bates) backing away from some threat. Next, the viewer sees a creepy, foggyContinue reading “Review of “The Return of the Vampire” (1943)”

Review of “The Sandman” by E. T. A. Hoffmann

This is a classic horror story, first published in 1816 in a collection titled “Nachtstücke” (“Night Pieces”) by E. T. A. Hoffmann, a writer, composer, and caricaturist with a day job as a jurist. It remains one of his most often anthologized works in English—and little wonder. Even if the language is a bit thickContinue reading “Review of “The Sandman” by E. T. A. Hoffmann”

Review of “Cold War” by Ike Lang

Plot: A broadcast appears unbidden across all screens, addressing the citizens of earth. An elderly man appears in full military uniform, medals and insignias across his chest. At his side stand four other men, also in military uniform, though their uniforms differ from his. “In early February, 1945,” he tells his audience, “our scientists pickedContinue reading “Review of “Cold War” by Ike Lang”

Review of “Earth vs. the Spider” (1958)

This is this week’s Saturday pizza and bad movie night movie. The pizza was good, the movie was hokey. Plot: In the opening sequences, a man (Merritt Stone) drives down a lonely road at night. He opens a small jewelry box containing a bracelet and a note: “To Carol with Love, Dad.” Something ahead startlesContinue reading “Review of “Earth vs. the Spider” (1958)”

Review of “Beloved” by T. R. Siebert

Plot:The narrator has a new boyfriend, which is charming. Complicating things, however, is that the boyfriend is “a planet-devouring cloud of nanobots the size of Jupiter.” Since the people of earth will soon fire a rocket into the beloved’s heart, some decisions have to be made. Thoughts:An aura of surrealism permeates this odd little tale.Continue reading “Review of “Beloved” by T. R. Siebert”

Review of “The Thing from Another World” (1951)

And now before giving you the details of the battle, I bring you a warning: Everyone of you listening to my voice, tell the world, tell this to everybody wherever they are. Watch the skies. Everywhere. Keep looking. Keep watching the skies.

Review of “8-Bit Free Will” by John Wiswell

Plot:The Hollow Knight and HealBlob form a video game duo, one an attacker and the other a healer. Together, they fight players and usually die a quick death before they have a chance to become aware of themselves or each other. The player Trent flips back and forth between the game, IMs with his sort-of-not-reallyContinue reading “Review of “8-Bit Free Will” by John Wiswell”

Review of “Eyespots” by Shannon Fay

Plot:Aurea the alien is taking Entomology 101. To everyone else, she looks like a beautiful human. The guys all move in, but she rebuffs them. She only has time for Clara, a creative writing major. Aurea’s persona as an alien, while cute, begins to wear thin. Thoughts: This is an extremely short piece, with everythingContinue reading “Review of “Eyespots” by Shannon Fay”